mobile communications

In this article, we show the path of the evolution in both standards and techniques and provide our vision for the future of the cellular networks. We review the evolution of international standards for cellular mobile networks in the last two decades, describe how the network layout has been migrating from rigid cellular architecture to random and dense small cells, and provide an in-depth discussion on potential enabling techniques for the next generation (5G) cellular networks

5G, mobile communications, MIMO, multiband base-station antennas

This article summarises the ‘state of play’ in 5G by reviewing the requirements that are driving its development, the performance targets it is aiming for and the technologies being explored to achieve these. It also compares the main capabilities of 5G with those of the earlier generations of mobile technology

5G, mobile communications

The results of ACCAN’s 2013 Affordability Forum are provided. A joint ACCAN-Anglicare Victoria research project shows that 6% of Anglicare’s clients in Victoria were deprived of all forms of telecommunications and 45% had only had one form of telecommunication service. A range of affordability policy ideas outlined at the forum are dkiscussed, with an emphasis on reforming the universal service obligation in the era of the national broadband network.

telecommunications policy, ACCAN, Anglicare, Universal Service Obligation, broadband affordability, mobile communications, digital divide, national broadband network.

This year is the 30th anniversary of Telecom Australia's launch of the cellular mobile service in Australia. There has been a huge evolution in mobile services since then.

The Postmaster-General's Department (PMG) introduced a manually (operator) connected mobile service in Australia in 1950. As this service approached full capacity, Telecom launched a Public Automatic Mobile Telephone Service (PAMTS) in 1981. The PAMTS service had no future technology evolution, a 12 year life, and reached a peak of 14,000 customers.

By 1985 a small engineering team had developed a cellular mobile service concept based on the Analogue Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) standard. Development was accelerated and refined and the service was launched in 1987, arguably two and perhaps three years late.

This is the story of the development and launch of the service and the growth over the first four years to 1991.

Noting the experience of cellular operators in the USA, Canada and the UK, Telecom's mobile service concept was a "gold standard" for cellular services around the world, and the service achieved one of the fastest growth rates in its early years.

Within four years it was a cash flow powerhouse, and one of only three services within Telecom that were profitable; the others were the basic telephone service and directory publishing.

When transferred to Telstra in 1992 it was a strategically strong, highly profitable business prepared to defend against competition being introduced into the Australian telecommunications market, and was a foundation of Telstra's financial strength for the next 30 years.

Australian telecommunications, mobile communications, Telecom Australia
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