Editorial

This editorial notes several key indicators of record growth in Australian telecommunications, as the backdrop to the second issue of this multidisciplinary policy Journal. The growth in social connectivity and ‘big data’, together with the rapid evolution of new infrastructure technologies, all pose interesting challenges for good policy making – and for keeping up with new developments

Telecommunications industry growth, 5G, NBN, privacy, Internet governance, public policy

On behalf of the Editorial Board, authors and readers of the Journal, the recently appointed Managing Editor Mark Gregory thanks the outgoing Managing Editor Peter Gerrand for his leadership, scholarly editing and hard work over the past 21 years.

AJTDE, Peter Gerrand, Mark Gregory

Papers cover Universal Service, legacy telecommunications equipment the rollout of Ultra-Fast Broadband in New Zealand. How to ensure that legacy telecommunications equipment is identified, upgraded and connected to the National Broadband Network or replaced. An update on the provision of reliable telecommunications to Antarctica and how Ericsson is celebrating the milestone of being a significant contributor to Australian telecommunications over the past 125 years.

USO, Legacy services, NBN

The September issue provides an interesting look at the National Broadband Network: and how it is perceived to have problems that need to be resolved; how telecommunications is having an effect on the lives of Australians, with discussion on how older Australians engage with online news; and how mobile phone use in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities is a balance between opportunity and affordability. Papers on future digital service delivery and metadata retention provide a balance between identifying future use and how authorities are looking our telecommunications usage.

NBN, Accessibility, policy, History

Some departing words from the Journal's Managing Director, Peter Gerrand, in stepping down from the role of Editor-in-Chief of the Telecommunications Journal of Australia and its successor, the Australian Journal of Telecommunications and the Digital Economy, after 21 years in the job.

Australian telecommunications, TJA, AJTDE, public policy

The back story to the implementation of Australia's first modern telecommunication link in 1854 is provided, together with a brief outline of the evolution of the telecommunications industry and its learned society over the subsequent 160 years.

History of Australian telecommunications, Charles La Trobe, Samuel McGowan, TelSoc

In the March 2016 issue papers cover a range of topics that include the UK BBC charter review, film and television being affected by Internet clichés and an interesting look at digital currencies. Two historical articles on the bombing of Darwin and radio telephone surveying provide interesting reading about past telecommunications challenges.

digital media, Block chain, History

Based on the subject matter canvassed in this issue of the TJA, three initiatives are proposed to stimulate early and wide take-up of the NBN and accelerate its economic and social dividend.

NBN

This editorial introduces the August 2012 issue of TJA, and celebrates the achievements of the late Dick Butler AM, former Secretary-General of the International Telecommunications Union, amongst others.

Charles Todd Oration, Dick Butler, Malcolm Long, ISPs, sponsors

The Australian telecommunications industry has been slow to call for or to adopt new practices and the National Broadband Network has exacerbated the problem of technology adoption lag. There are two key issues facing telecommunication consumers today. The cost of optical networking has significantly reduced over the past five years so there is no justification for the network congestion that occurs on Australian telecommunication networks. To remedy this situation the introduction of performance monitoring is fully supported. It is time for the telecommunications industry to adopt new broadband business models that are based on the provision of unlimited data and a maximum of 90 to 95 per cent utilisation on optical network links.

NBN, Performance Monitoring, Unlimited data
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