Broadband

This article outlines the basics of IPTV technology and provide examples of its being used in a variety of situations across the educational spectrum, including tertiary education, continuing professional development (CPD), and personally tailored education services in the home for the wider community.

This article examines the views of a selection of national governments on the desirability of ubiquitous high speed broadband and any plans or policies in place to achieve this. It notes that 82 percent of investment in 2012-17 in the world?s developed countries is estimated to be in FTTH.

Australia?s fixed broadband services performance and takeup is continuing to fall behind other comparable countries in international benchmarks. Indecision about the structure of Australia?s broadband market is likely to continue to retard medium to long term investment in the fibre infrastructure needed to improve Australia?s broadband rankings against its international peers.

This guest editorial provides an overview of eight papers describing early experiences with high speed broadband.

Central to discussions about NBN-enabled applications and services is the potential for innovative ways of learning, particularly in relation to online and interactive education. This paper reports on trials of the collaborative software tool Adobe Connect in NSW schools, and reports on two field studies for Zoo Connect, an interactive, multimedia, remotely-delivered class lesson. Results from the trials support those who advocate the NBN as a means to extend classroom learning, and provide evidence that may prompt educators to transition to virtual classrooms sooner rather than later. Recommendations are made for the wider development of NBN-style education programs, regardless of whether or not they fall into the early rollout category/regions, in order to fast track innovation, encourage educators and assist communities to better envisage how the NBN will impact the education domain.

In this paper, we investigate the use of ambient technology to create a classroom presence for hospitalised children. We present results from four case studies, each of which included data from hospitalised children, their parents, classmates and teachers (at both school and hospital). Primary school-aged children from both metropolitan and rural areas were included. Data collected at both the hospital and the classroom were analysed to investigate children's experience of the ambient technology and their desire to be aware of the presence of their peers, from both ends of the hospital-school setting. The results indicate that ambient technology is positive at fostering a mutual sense of presence, from the perspective of the hospitalised children, their family, teachers and classmates.

A focus in this issue of the TJA is what educational institutions, especially universities, are and might be doing with broadband. Particular educational applications covered here include: ambient technology; web conferencing and collaboration; IPTV; virtual schools; universities as media organisations; and the future for journalism practice and economics.

This editorial introduces the major themes and the authors of the articles appearing in TJA Vol. 63 No.3 (June 2013).

This paper reports on a review of Australian political party websites and presents a case study on the redesign of the Dignity for Disability website as a roadmap for web developers on practical strategies for redesigning websites to meet international web accessibility guidelines.

Trevor Manokore

The Australian Telecoms market has lagged globally which has meant the technological adoptions of new technology has been challenging for global vendors. With industry consolidation and the NBN roll out the changes to the industry are happening more rapidly than ever before. The question is ? how will these be adopted ? who are the winners and losers?

Trevor Manokore

When: 

Tue, 23 Feb 2016 - 12:30pm AEDT

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

Pages

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