Broadband

Ray Owen

Each year TelSoc hosts the Henry Sutton Oration in Melbourne to commemorate the distinguished Victorian scientist, engineer and inventor from Ballarat, Henry Sutton - who is scarcely known, but had a string of accomplishments and innovations in many areas.

This year we are pleased to have as the Orator an experienced technologist from the telecommunications industry who has recently taken on one of the key technology jobs in Australia - Ray Owen, CTO of NBN Co.

Ray Owen, CTO of NBN Co

When: 

Wed, 20 Jun 2018 - 11:45am AEST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

This paper takes the approach that industry developments, the structure of governmental decision-making bodies, and policy responses are interdependent and mutually shaped. How ministries and regulatory bodies are designed and put together affects both their policy outlooks and managerial capabilities, in turn affecting their policy output. Governments have also consciously restructured ministries and regulators in order to promote specific policy orientations, or in response to changes in the industry. This three-way interaction is critically important to the responses of governments to the emerging broadband ecosystem.  The paper examines four different restructurings in the Korean government, and argues that the identification of a governmental agency as a nodal agency was the result of a new policy orientation, and the response to a change in the industrial environment. Though no two countries are totally similar in terms of their industrial and political environments or policy needs, the paper is based on the premise that the example of South Korea has useful lessons for other countries, as a leading indicator of changes in government regulatory structures in response to convergence and the emergence of the broadband ecosystem.

In this paper we analyse the evolution of the Italian telecommunications market since the beginning of the liberalisation and privatisation process in Italy started in the mid-nineties.  We present a survey of the main regulatory interventions in the industry as well as the market structure and its dynamics in the period 2000-2015. We also provide some insights on the current state of the ultra-fast broadband access and the evolution of the so called ?next generation networks?. The recent Italian government?s plan regarding the deployment of the broadband services is also discussed. 

TransACT (2000- ) introduced Australia?s first VDSL network, offering a ?triple play? of voice, data (e.g. Internet access), broadcast and video-on-demand services in Australia?s capital city, Canberra, in competition with the incumbent carrier Telstra. TransACT?s founding Chief Architect, Robin Eckermann, reminisces on the founding of TransACT and some of the lessons to be learned from this fore-runner of the National Broadband Network (NBN).

John Monash Science School, Monash University and Pearson Australia have joined together to provide the NBN (National Broadband Network) Virtual School of Emerging Sciences (NVSES), linking together Year 10 students who are passionate about science.

This article outlines the basics of IPTV technology and provide examples of its being used in a variety of situations across the educational spectrum, including tertiary education, continuing professional development (CPD), and personally tailored education services in the home for the wider community.

This article examines the views of a selection of national governments on the desirability of ubiquitous high speed broadband and any plans or policies in place to achieve this. It notes that 82 percent of investment in 2012-17 in the world?s developed countries is estimated to be in FTTH.

Australia?s fixed broadband services performance and takeup is continuing to fall behind other comparable countries in international benchmarks. Indecision about the structure of Australia?s broadband market is likely to continue to retard medium to long term investment in the fibre infrastructure needed to improve Australia?s broadband rankings against its international peers.

This guest editorial provides an overview of eight papers describing early experiences with high speed broadband.

Central to discussions about NBN-enabled applications and services is the potential for innovative ways of learning, particularly in relation to online and interactive education. This paper reports on trials of the collaborative software tool Adobe Connect in NSW schools, and reports on two field studies for Zoo Connect, an interactive, multimedia, remotely-delivered class lesson. Results from the trials support those who advocate the NBN as a means to extend classroom learning, and provide evidence that may prompt educators to transition to virtual classrooms sooner rather than later. Recommendations are made for the wider development of NBN-style education programs, regardless of whether or not they fall into the early rollout category/regions, in order to fast track innovation, encourage educators and assist communities to better envisage how the NBN will impact the education domain.

Pages

Subscribe to Broadband