National Broadband Network

Papers in the June 2018 issue of the Journal cover what to do with the National Broadband Network when the rollout is completed, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle communications, energy efficient mobile ad-hoc network communications and a historical look at the Black Mountain Tower in Canberra. With the completion of the National Broadband Network rollout in coming years, there will be an opportunity for substantive wholesale telecommunications reforms. 

This paper considers what the government of the day should do with the NBN after the NBN is built and fully operational in 2022. It discusses four options for the ownership of NBN Co beyond 2022 and describes arguments for and against each option.

The paper ?Revisiting the Structural Separation of Telstra?, published in the Spring 2004 issue of the Telecommunications Journal of Australia and republished here, provided the policy rationale for structural separation at the time, and detailed how it could have been achieved.

This article reviews recent developments in global broadband deployments and highlights the growing global dominance of fibre to the premises (FTTP). Australia?s increasing use of fibre to the node (FTTN) has locked the country out of world-class broadband for years to come. If Australia is ever to obtain first-class broadband services, it will be necessary to replace FTTN with higher speed technologies.

Australia?s increasing use of fibre to the node (FTTN) has locked the country out of world-class broadband for years to come.

Mike Quigley

The impact of the NBN on the future of Australia's connectivity, technological developments, and networked society remains an important topic. Mike Quigley was the first employee of NBN Co and its CEO for four years. He will reflect on the ups and downs of the NBN project over the past several years, and considers the various options to complete the NBN.

Mike Quigley

When: 

Wed, 22 Jun 2016 - 06:00pm AEST

Location: 

Carlton, VIC

This paper addresses the limitations of the Australian government's new NBN policy (11 December 2014) and proposes some changes in approach which share the objectives of the policy but without compromising access speed. The changes will eliminate the lead-in cost entirely and will introduce infrastructure competition in the long-term interests of end-users. They will accelerate the NBN roll-out and ensure that the national infrastructure is responsive to future technologies, market demands and business opportunities.

In this paper we outline a number of matters that have been raised in relation to Deep-fibre Fibre-to-the-Distribution-Point (FTTdp), and address practical ways that FTTdp can be expected to deliver a maximum overall cost-benefit outcome for the Australian NBN. We conclude that FTTdp must be honestly evaluated if the nation is to achieve a maximal NBN capability outcome.

This article examines the views of a selection of national governments on the desirability of ubiquitous high speed broadband and any plans or policies in place to achieve this. It notes that 82 percent of investment in 2012-17 in the world?s developed countries is estimated to be in FTTH.

Dr Mark Gregory - RMIT University

The National Broadband Network (NBN) is a nation building project that will underpin Australia's telecommunications and broadband services for the next thirty years. This presentation will provide details of the technologies being used to build the NBN and discuss the opportunities for new technologies and engineering advances to enhance the NBN over time whilst reducing the rollout duration and cost.

Dr Mark Gregory - RMIT University

When: 

Tue, 28 Apr 2015 - 12:30pm AEST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

Pages

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