National Broadband Network

Dr Mark Gregory - RMIT University

The National Broadband Network (NBN) is a nation building project that will underpin Australia's telecommunications and broadband services for the next thirty years. This presentation will provide details of the technologies being used to build the NBN and discuss the opportunities for new technologies and engineering advances to enhance the NBN over time whilst reducing the rollout duration and cost.

Dr Mark Gregory - RMIT University

When: 

Tue, 28 Apr 2015 - 12:30pm AEST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

This paper spells out the negative consequences of the Government?s policy to remove the NBN Co?s current monopoly in providing fixed broadband access infrastructure: for the federal budget, for the competition framework in telecommunications, for a forced premature sale of NBN Co, and for the affordable rollout of high-speed broadband access across the nation.

Fig.1 - comparing retail pricing NBN 25/5 vs ADSL2+

This is the text of Mike Quigley's talk on receiving TelSoc's 2013 Charles Todd Medal at a special function in Sydney on 2 December 2013, hosted by Telstra. It provides his reflections on what NBN Co achieved in in the first four years of NBN Co (2009-13), the challenges that the company faced, and how it overcame them.

Developing the best NBN strategy for Australia needs to take cost into consideration, and this article asserts that there is scope for NBN Co to improve its performance in this area. The article argues that FTTN/DSL solutions can deliver good quality broadband, and that the current HFC access netwokrs in Australia can be upgraded to provide next-generation speeds.

This paper provides a flexible upgrade path for the Australian National Broadband Network (NBN), given that the new federal government has a policy of altering the construction methodology to introduce a copper-based access system such as Fibre to the Node (FTTN). The operational advantages of eliminating FTTN cabinets by use of FTTS (Fibre to the Street) technology are spelled out.

The National Broadband Network (NBN) has the potential to transform economic and social relations. But realising that potential requires universal take-up and significant utilisation of the NBN. This paper examines how NBN wholesale pricing can help to do this. It introduces a mark-up concept to build a bridge between wholesale and retail prices, provides a yard-stick for how we might define affordable retail pricing and suggests how an entry level wholesale price can be specified to deliver that and enable low income customers to access the NBN.

Journalism enterprises which serve populations ?on the move? using telecommunications are supported by a strong economic rationale and the existence of historical precedents. The paper demonstrates that the international and domestic movement of passengers, cargo and discrete groups of linked individuals represents a new productivity opportunity for Australia.

This paper outlines the technological capacities of NBN-based multicast Internet Protocol Television (IPTV), and examines public comment and interview data from ISPs, sports organisations and NBN Co. regarding their intentions for IPTV delivery. The paper points out the important role that regulators will have in maintaining diversity and competition in IPTV services.

The first critique to be published of the Coalition's  NBN policy, within 18 hours of its launch on 9 April 2010, identifies weaknesses in that policy which remain valid today. Written by Peter Gerrand, it appeared in The Conversation on 10 April 2013.

I

This paper reports initial findings from two of the latest research projects commissioned by Innovation and Business Skills Australia. Studies into digital literacy and adoption of information technology and broadband services at three of the earliest NBN release sites show that the readiness to compete in the Digital Economy is affected by the ability to acquire specific ICT skills.

Pages

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