NBN

Graeme Samuel AC

The shape of the Coalition?s NBN is becoming clearer, but what will this mean to competition? The market is in a state of evolution bordering on revolution, with challenges for all players big and small. Much will depend on how they respond. The regulators can heavily influence the outcomes for both competition and consumers; but should regulation be limited to ensuring the NBN is not able to exercise its monopoly power? The trick will be to not stifle the competitive forces and technical advances sweeping our telecommunications and media industries.

Graeme Samuel AC

When: 

Wed, 05 Nov 2014 - 12:00pm AEDT

Location: 

Adelaide, SA
Graeme Samuel AC

The shape of the Coalition?s NBN is becoming clearer, but what will this mean to competition? The market is in a state of evolution bordering on revolution, with challenges for all players big and small. Much will depend on how they respond. The regulators can heavily influence the outcomes for both competition and consumers; but should regulation be limited to ensuring the NBN is not able to exercise its monopoly power? The trick will be to not stifle the competitive forces and technical advances sweeping our telecommunications and media industries.

Graeme Samuel AC

When: 

Wed, 05 Nov 2014 - 12:30pm AEDT

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
Gary McLaren

This month's TelSoc lunchtime lecture follows the TelSoc AGM. It includes Gary McLaren and Bob James discussing the status of NBN today. Is it back on track, or could a yet another path emerge? The 3 major reviews of the NBN have now been delivered and provide much to discuss.

Gary McLaren
Bob James

When: 

Tue, 28 Oct 2014 - 11:45am AEDT

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
Graeme Samuel AC

The shape of the Coalition?s NBN is becoming clearer, but what will this mean to competition? The market is in a state of evolution bordering on revolution, with challenges for all players big and small. Much will depend on how they respond. The regulators can heavily influence the outcomes for both competition and consumers; but should regulation be limited to ensuring the NBN is not able to exercise its monopoly power? The trick will be to not stifle the competitive forces and technical advances sweeping our telecommunications and media industries.

Graeme Samuel AC

When: 

Wed, 05 Nov 2014 - 12:00pm AEDT

Location: 

Pyrmont, NSW
Dr Craig Watkins

Fibre to the Distribution Point (FTTdp) has received relatively little national attention to date as a serious technology option for the Australian NBN. In recent months there has been further publication of difficulties of FTTP (Fibre to the Premises) connections, with fibre cabling failure rates of the order of 30%.

Dr Craig Watkins
Ing. Kelvin Lillingstone-Hall

When: 

Tue, 30 Sep 2014 - 12:30pm AEST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

This paper describes how hybrid fibre coaxial networks can provide all the required features of the Australian National Broadband Network (NBN) and the potential upgrade path to a future all-fibre access network.

24 high-level representatives were interviewed from across Australian society and industry to explore (a) what changes might occur in each sector once next generation broadband (NGB) is widely available and (b) what action is needed to prepare for these changes.

Fibre to the Distribution Point (FTTdp) is a broadband access network technology that encompasses fibre to the street lead-in pit at the front fence, with an average copper lead-in length of 30m. FTTdp promises very high VDSL2 capability, with easy upgrading to G.fast or individual FTTP (Fibre to the Premises) on an on-demand basis. The network capability of FTTdp is thus very close to the capability of a full FTTP deployment. Cost savings compared to FTTP promise to be substantial ? a possible $12 billion in savings for the Australian National Broadband Network (NBN). For these and other reasons, FTTdp is recommended as a more cost-effective solution than Fibre to the Node for the NBN.

This editorial notes several key indicators of record growth in Australian telecommunications, as the backdrop to the second issue of this multidisciplinary policy Journal. The growth in social connectivity and ?big data?, together with the rapid evolution of new infrastructure technologies, all pose interesting challenges for good policy making ? and for keeping up with new developments

Dr Nguyen Duc

Gigabit Networks are capable of delivering bidirectional service access speeds of up to one gigabit per second (1Gbps) and are in operation in several countries around the world.

The presentation highlights five Gigabit Networks including a review of the motivations behind their developments, deployment approaches and service offerings: 

Dr Nguyen Duc

When: 

Tue, 25 Feb 2014 - 12:00pm AEDT

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC

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