Book review

A new book, The Weatherman from Greenwich: Charles Todd ? 1826 to 1910, promises to be a biography of Charles Todd, telecommunications pioneer in Australia. The title is, however, misleading. Most of the book is devoted to social influences in England and South Australia that may have shaped Todd?s early life. Todd?s early technical experience in England and his first activities in Australia are briefly sketched. Readers seeking a fuller account of Todd?s life and achievements should look elsewhere.

In 2017 a new biography, Behind the Legend - The Many Worlds of Charles Todd, by Denis Cryle, was published. Cryle has written an engaging book that is thoroughly researched and referenced. It will appeal both to historians and to the general reader without expertise in any of the scientific or technical fields inhabited by Todd.

A book review of Chaos Monkeys: Inside the Silicon Valley Money Machine, published 2016. The book is a warts-and-all account that describes many undesirable aspects of ?Silicon Valley culture?. While the book is overly self-indulgent, it could valuably be read by policy makers interested in start-ups and business culture.

Grand Intentions by Trevor Barr is an exciting read that involves many themes and works at many levels.  It concerns a fictitious telephone company, Telco One, which is undergoing major change as the Government privatises it.  Telco One is in the throes of moving from a traditional culture based on public sector, even public service, values to a commercial entity subject to the overwhelming imperative of shareholder value.  The twists and turns as Telco One transforms from its previous culture into a dynamic commercial entity are transfixing.  This is a must-read book for those with an interest in what could become a dystopian drama if not for the emergence and re-emergence of grand intentions and praiseworthy aspirations of the characters themselves.

Trevor Barr?s page-turner of a novel Grand Intentions tackles the ugly side of the neo-liberalism sweeping Australia in the 1990s and 2000s.  It examines the privatisation of an incumbent telecommunications carrier, and the drastic impact of its imported US corporate culture on several individuals. He deploys a cast of plausible fictional characters while allowing the narrative to be driven by an echo of real events in the Australian telecommunications industry.

A book review of 'Networking Services: QoS, Signalling, Processes' [Amazon Digital Services: ASIN BooIJFZTWC], by Harry Perros

Review of Christopher T. Marsden: Internet Co-Regulation: European Law, Regulatory Governance and Legitimacy in Cyberspace, (2011, Cambridge University Press)

This article reviews Asian Data Privacy Laws ? Trade and Human Rights Perspectives' by Graham Greenleaf, University of New South Wales

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