Editorial

The future of the $51 billion Australian National Broadband Network (NBN) remains unknown, with the Government still to commit to a course of action after the current build phase. Industry representatives have recently voiced their concerns about a potential future sale of the NBN and how this would occur. In response, the Telecommunications Association is hosting a public forum on the future of the NBN on 31 July 2019. Papers in the June 2019 issue of the Journal include discussion on consumer interest in 5G in New Zealand, the history of Australian mail handling and technical papers covering a range of interesting topics.

Papers in the March 2019 issue of the Journal include discussion on the National Broadband Network, technical papers on the Internet, MANET and Cloud security and a fascinating look back at the Eucla Recorder. The history of Australian telecommunications paper covers the Australian Post Office’s involvement in the Apollo 13 emergency and a review of laser developments. In the present day, 8K televisions launch in Australia on 1 April 2019 and in the process move entertainment and telecommunications into the next phase of development.

Papers in the December 2018 issue of the Journal include discussion on 5G security, what’s next for the National Broadband Network, a technical paper on the conflicts in routing and UAV autonomy, HTTP traffic flow load balancing and an insight into how the use of location information affects privacy. The history of Australian telecommunications paper on impressions of an overseas visit by a lines engineer provides an insight into how knowledge transfer improves with the opportunity to study telecommunications in Europe, North America and Australia.

The September 2018 issue provides a mix of public policy debate and technology contributions. Policy papers cover fixed broadband adoption and economic growth in ASEAN and a framework to demystify machine-to-machine spectrum regulation. A technical paper on bitmaps and bitmasks provides an insight into the latest tools and techniques, and an historical paper looks at communications for the America's Cup.

Papers in the June 2018 issue of the Journal cover what to do with the National Broadband Network when the rollout is completed, Unmanned Aerial Vehicle communications, energy efficient mobile ad-hoc network communications and a historical look at the Black Mountain Tower in Canberra. With the completion of the National Broadband Network rollout in coming years, there will be an opportunity for substantive wholesale telecommunications reforms. 

Over the next decade telecommunications will take centre stage as the way that we live, interact with our family and friends and the things around us changes faster than at any time in history. Papers in the December 2017 issue of the Journal cover historical events, book reviews and international telecommunications markets including a unique look at the development of the telecommunications market in Canada.

The TelSoc forum in mid-November (in Melbourne) is rapidly approaching. Government telecommunications sector security reform agenda makes this forum highly relevant to the future of the sector.

The Australian telecommunications industry has been slow to call for or to adopt new practices and the National Broadband Network has exacerbated the problem of technology adoption lag. The cost of optical networking has significantly reduced over the past five years so there is no justification for the network congestion that occurs on Australian telecommunication networks.

In the March 2016 issue papers cover a range of topics that include the UK BBC charter review, film and television being affected by Internet clich?s and an interesting look at digital currencies. Two historical articles on the bombing of Darwin and radio telephone surveying provide interesting reading about past telecommunications challenges.

Some departing words from the Journal's Managing Director, Peter Gerrand, in stepping down from the role of Editor-in-Chief of the Telecommunications Journal of Australia and its successor, the Australian Journal of Telecommunications and the Digital Economy, after 21 years in the job.

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