Welcome

TelSoc is a multidisciplinary society whose aim is to promote knowledge, understanding and excellence in telecommunications and its applications including the digital economy. There are regular networking activities and lectures in all states of Australia plus two keynote orations each year. TelSoc also publishes the Australian Journal of Telecommunications and the Digital Economy.

Financial members can attend events at little or no charge plus have free access to the Journal. There is also a student membership category at a substantial discount from full membership.

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A satirical distopia concerning the effect of the Trump Presidency on future telecommunications

The Australian telecommunications industry has been slow to call for or to adopt new practices and the National Broadband Network has exacerbated the problem of technology adoption lag. There are two key issues facing telecommunication consumers today. The cost of optical networking has significantly reduced over the past five years so there is no justification for the network congestion that occurs on Australian telecommunication networks. To remedy this situation the introduction of performance monitoring is fully supported. It is time for the telecommunications industry to adopt new broadband business models that are based on the provision of unlimited data and a maximum of 90 to 95 per cent utilisation on optical network links.

It would be wrong to expect either market or legislative stability in the telecommunications industry given the rapidly changing technology and the demands of users. Whilst stability may not be achievable there are aspects of telecommunications competition policy that are broken. Now is not the time to take an axe to the telecommunications competition legislation.

Broadband prices differ significantly throughout the world. This article discusses some methodologies for comparing broadband prices between countries, and suggesting five factors that influence broadband prices: supply, demand, governmental policy and regulation, average price level throughout the economy as a whole,  and physical/infrastructural factors. In this discussion, we also examine where Australia sits in relation to global broadband prices.

In this paper a review of existing telecommunications legislation and regulations in New Zealand (NZ) is conducted. The paper highlights the existing legislation in the country and discusses the organizations responsible for regulating the underlying laws. Recommendations for changes to the existing legislation and regulations in NZ are provided which are based on the current and on-going demand for telecommunication services.

Australia’s increasing use of fibre to the node (FTTN) has locked the country out of world-class broadband for years to come.

This article recounts the evolution and current state of the Mexican telecommunications ecosystem, briefly describing new challenges and opportunities posed by the digital economy.

In this paper we analyse the evolution of the Italian telecommunications market since the beginning of the liberalisation and privatisation process in Italy started in the mid-nineties.  We present a survey of the main regulatory interventions in the industry as well as the market structure and its dynamics in the period 2000-2015. We also provide some insights on the current state of the ultra-fast broadband access and the evolution of the so called “next generation networks”. The recent Italian government’s plan regarding the deployment of the broadband services is also discussed. 

This article reviews the development and progress of the Korean telecommunications industry. A brief history of Korean telecommunications is provided. The government’s role as a key player within industry and relevant policy is analysed. An analysis of the market competition and regulation systems as well as customer protections is conducted. IoT and 5G technologies are introduced to enable Korea to continue leading the global market.

In this paper, we introduce SCOR (Software-defined Constrained Optimal Routing), a new Software Defined Networking (SDN) Northbound Interface for QoS routing and traffic engineering.

The road to net neutrality within the European Union (EU) has been slow and winding. However, a major milestone was reached in August 2016 through the publication of the BEREC Guidelines on the Implementation by National Regulators of European Net Neutrality Rules. This extended article explores the scope of the net neutrality principle as understood and applied in a number of jurisdictions. The approach in the EU is contrasted with the approaches of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the United States (US) and of a number of other countries.

This year is the 30th anniversary of Telecom Australia's launch of the cellular mobile service in Australia. There has been a huge evolution in mobile services since then.

The Postmaster-General's Department (PMG) introduced a manually (operator) connected mobile service in Australia in 1950. As this service approached full capacity, Telecom launched a Public Automatic Mobile Telephone Service (PAMTS) in 1981. The PAMTS service had no future technology evolution, a 12 year life, and reached a peak of 14,000 customers.

By 1985 a small engineering team had developed a cellular mobile service concept based on the Analogue Mobile Phone Service (AMPS) standard. Development was accelerated and refined and the service was launched in 1987, arguably two and perhaps three years late.

This is the story of the development and launch of the service and the growth over the first four years to 1991.

Noting the experience of cellular operators in the USA, Canada and the UK, Telecom's mobile service concept was a "gold standard" for cellular services around the world, and the service achieved one of the fastest growth rates in its early years.

Within four years it was a cash flow powerhouse, and one of only three services within Telecom that were profitable; the others were the basic telephone service and directory publishing.

When transferred to Telstra in 1992 it was a strategically strong, highly profitable business prepared to defend against competition being introduced into the Australian telecommunications market, and was a foundation of Telstra's financial strength for the next 30 years.

This paper takes the approach that industry developments, the structure of governmental decision-making bodies, and policy responses are interdependent and mutually shaped. How ministries and regulatory bodies are designed and put together affects both their policy outlooks and managerial capabilities, in turn affecting their policy output. Governments have also consciously restructured ministries and regulators in order to promote specific policy orientations, or in response to changes in the industry. This three-way interaction is critically important to the responses of governments to the emerging broadband ecosystem.  The paper examines four different restructurings in the Korean government, and argues that the identification of a governmental agency as a nodal agency was the result of a new policy orientation, and the response to a change in the industrial environment. Though no two countries are totally similar in terms of their industrial and political environments or policy needs, the paper is based on the premise that the example of South Korea has useful lessons for other countries, as a leading indicator of changes in government regulatory structures in response to convergence and the emergence of the broadband ecosystem.

This article describes the telecommunications market in Poland, and explores the organisation and infrastructure of Poland’s networks as well as the evolution of this sector within the last few decades. It attempts to put a number of issues in the Polish experience in perspective. This can be used to focus further efforts in both Poland and in other nations.

A fascinating paper from 1952 describing the construction of an aerial trunk route and the problems associated with organisation of staff, equipment and materials.

This article describes how Australia’s metadata retention and disclosure regime addresses the retention and disclosure of location information and location identifiers by locally licensed providers and those that do not require a licence to operate in Australia. The paper argues the retention limitations in respect of over the-top-content and communications services are undermined by the actions of the agencies to harvest location information and conduct Big Data analytics. So does the discretion granted to the telecommunications service provider to retain location information in respect of over the-top-content and communications services.

This article provides an overview of the changing legal and regulatory regime for telecommunications and related services in Australia by charting the changes in regulation from 1901 to the present, and by indicating some of the changes that are still evolving. The article is intended to provide a framework for comparison between regulatory regimes in different jurisdictions, and as the basis for further analysis of the sector.

This paper aims at describing the evolution of the telecommunications industry in Spain. It debuts with the monopolist situation of the market in the mid 90s and then analyses the consecutive legal and regulatory reforms designed with a view to the liberalisation and introduction of perfect competition in this economic sector. The paper also considers the relationships and tensions between national Spanish and EU legislation in this area, as well as giving a critical approach on the current organisation model chosen vis-à-vis the independent regulatory authority.

Three historic papers detailing the breadth of research undertaken by the Research Laboratories of the Postmaster-General's Department (now Telstra).

Today Australia's telecommunications market is strongly contested. Competitors with highly skilled, experienced and focused marketing teams battle for market position, market share and profit growth. This has not always been so. Historically Telecom Australia's predominantly engineering culture believed that it only needed a nominal marketing department and no sales force. This is a brief story of the building of a new sales force over the first five years. After five years the "subscribers" were more widely addressed and treated as "customers" but it was to be at least another six years before the company made the customers the focus of the business.

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Society news

At the 2016 Charles Todd Oration event in Sydney on 19 October, Professor Peter Gerrand, Chair of the TelSoc Selection Panel, awarded the 2016 Medallist to Dr Simon Poole, saying “Simon Poole is a technologist and entrepreneur who has made outstanding contributions to the world’s optical fibre infrastructure. Read more

Broadband education package released for consumers
Consumers now have access to an education package designed to help them better understand the factors that can influence the performance of their broadband service.

Telco positions escape 457 visa axing
Telecommunications jobs have largely been unaffected by the scrapping of the 457 visa skilled migration program announced this week by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull.

Cormann rejects write-down advice on NBN from Slattery

TPG shows it want to play with the big boys
TPG is a contradiction in terms, especially when one considers other players in the Australian telco space: it is both low-key and also very ambitious.

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Forthcoming events

Håkan Eriksson

Each year TelSoc hosts the Henry Sutton Oration in Melbourne to commemorate the distinguished Victorian scientist, engineer and inventor from Ballarat, Henry Sutton - who is scarcely known, but had a string of accomplishments and innovations in many areas.

We are pleased to have as the Orator distinguished innovator ...

Håkan Eriksson

When: 

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 - 07:15am EST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
Jose Torres

Jose will explore and discuss Low-Power Wide-Area Network (LPWAN) solutions based on LTE-NB, LoRaWAN and Sigfox for IoT services in the Australia/New Zealand region.

Jose Torres

When: 

Thu, 27 Apr 2017 - 12:30pm EST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
Dr. Sonia Gul

The telecommunications industry is growing and changing at a very high pace. The growth is not only in terms of volume but also in terms of changing needs and technology. To keep up with this high pace and fast changing technologies countries need strong legislation and an efficient regulatory system to promote fair competition in industry. This presentation is a review of existing telecommunications’ legislation and regulations in New Zealand.

Dr. Sonia Gul
Nurul Sarkar

When: 

Tue, 30 May 2017 - 12:30pm EST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
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Latest presentation media

Smarter cities and innovation are on the national agenda, but how does a city get smarter and why does it matter?

2017-04-04 - 12:00 EST

Smart cities and innovation are on the national agenda, but are they enough to ensure Australia captures the full economic opportunity?

2017-03-29 - 17:30 EST

This presentation will compare international broadband prices, and then suggest five factors that influence the price differences. The analysis also clarifies where Australia sits in relation to global broadband prices.

2017-02-28 - 12:30 EST

This MEMBERS ONLY event incorporates a sandwich lunch, the TelSoc's Annual General Meeting and a presentation about the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) presented by Carolyn Phiddian - GM Technology Strategy / CTO at nbn.

2016-11-29 - 11:30 EST

You may be surprised to know that Australian residential fibre access to not exclusive to the nbn, and that competitive access has been in place since before the nbn.

The TelSoc is privileged to host Phil Smith from Opticom, an Australian pioneer in deployment of fibre explain the competitive fibre access environment in Australia and outline the pros and cons in the existing model.

2016-11-15 - 12:00 EST
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