Welcome

TelSoc is a multidisciplinary society whose aim is to promote knowledge, understanding and excellence in telecommunications and its applications including the digital economy. There are regular networking activities and lectures in all states of Australia plus two keynote orations each year. TelSoc also publishes the Australian Journal of Telecommunications and the Digital Economy.

Financial members can attend events at little or no charge plus have free access to the Journal. There is also a student membership category at a substantial discount from full membership.

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Papers cover Universal Service, legacy telecommunications equipment the rollout of Ultra-Fast Broadband in New Zealand. How to ensure that legacy telecommunications equipment is identified, upgraded and connected to the National Broadband Network or replaced. An update on the provision of reliable telecommunications to Antarctica and how Ericsson is celebrating the milestone of being a significant contributor to Australian telecommunications over the past 125 years.
2015 marks the 125th anniversary of Ericsson supplying telecommunications equipment in Australia. The history of Ericsson in Australia is précised here and the paper entitled “Establishing L M Ericsson Crossbar Production in Australia” is included for historic reference.
The New Zealand Government’s Ultrafast Broadband (UFB) initiative is now more than halfway completed. Pleasingly, deployment of Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) has tracked ahead of schedule over the last two years. As at September 2015, deployment was 56% complete, with over 800,000 households and businesses able to connect, equating to around 44% of the NZ population able to connect to an optic fibre broadband service.
The Australian Antarctic Division has a long history of providing telecommunications as part of the support provided to expeditioners within the Australian Antarctic Territory. Since the days when Mawson’s expedition in 1911 setup the first transmitter at Commonwealth Bay, the Division has provided continuous and increasingly sophisticated telecommunications capability that now includes data to support medical services, science, education and Internet access. The provision of telecommunications to Antarctica relies on satellite transmission for backhaul.
Amateur Radio operators of our fathers' or grandfathers' era typically set-up transmitting stations in sheds down the backyard with wire antennas strung between the trees. Talking to people around the world on HF amateur bands was cool then, as even a phone call interstate was tricky; you needed to book a time with the telephone trunk operator, and it cost a small fortune. The more adventurous amateurs experimented with frequencies above 30MHz, and many pushed the limits of the available technology. In 1947, an Australian amateur (VK5KL) made a two-way contact on 50MHz with an amateur in Hawaii (W7ACS/KH6), a path of 9000 km. That was esoteric stuff - how times have changed!
Pervasive sensing facilitated by Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) technologies offers the integration of modern technology into daily routine. The smart sensing approach offers the ability to sense ambient parameters and the use of different objects in the urban environment. The WSNs with the application of the Internet of Things (IoT) and Cloud computing are producing smart home solutions. This research work aims to develop smart home and building solutions based on IoT and cloud computing. The research described applies in smart homes to benefit humankind.
Software-Defined Networking (SDN) removes the limitations of current network infrastructures by separating the control plane from the data forwarding plane. Networks can be managed more cost-effectively and autonomously through centralising decision-making and programmability.This opens up markets for infrastructure providers to provision and offer network resources on-demand to multiple tenants and for service providers to develop and deploy their services on shared infrastructure resources cost-effectively.
The subject of legacy telecommunication systems is often overlooked in the pursuit of technological advancement, yet somehow the result is often less than graceful with end users left walking a tightrope between technology they are familiar with, and the evolving replacement systems.
Computer systems, technologies and applications that do not meet current standards, known as legacy systems, are increasingly connected to the Internet for various reasons. Connecting them to an environment that they were never intended for can potentially have serious operational security risk implications. This article discusses some of the reasons.
When faced with the need to move their services to the National Broadband Network (NBN), many consumers discover quite late in the process that their new NBN-based service has left their legacy PSTN connect devices behind.
Interconnected devices and the true ‘internet’ cause security challenges to organisations with critical legacy systems. This article discusses a number of legacy issues around Industrial Control Systems and ‘untouchable’ legacy devices and proposes a number of easy and effective mitigations to the practices that expose them to the world.
This article provides a brief introduction to a timely set of papers critically discussing universal service in telecommunications and proposing policy option. This is a longstanding public policy issue, moving once more into the foreground in Australia. The article puts the papers into context, and argues for the need to reconnect universal service policy with fertile and productive research, policy, social and technology innovation in other areas. Finally, the paper argues for the urgent need to fundamentally reimagine universal service to achieve the still relevant goal of access for all to essential communications technology.
The Universal Service Obligation (USO) scheme in Australia today is 25 years old. This paper shows how the current USO entrenches an annual subsidy of some $300M to Telstra. The current expensive USO scheme is inadequate and in the light of modern developments in broadband and mobile. The paper reviews the approach taken to across the world and draws lessons for a way forward to establish a Universal Service Fund (USF) where the NBN is the Universal Infrastructure wholesale provider with alternative retailers. The paper supports five practical interrelated recommendations as well as reimagining future payphones around public WiFi and rural community innovation.
This paper draws upon a research paper prepared for the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN). The focus of this paper is on the best way to provide every adult with universally available, accessible, affordable and empowering communications. Special attention is given to affordability, leading to a litmus test of an affordable broadband tariff. The paper proposes two options for delivering universal service objectives in future. One does not require any carrier to be nominated as the universal retail service provider. The other extends Telstra’s current obligations.
The policy of universal service must change. The 1975 world of a government-owned monopoly provider obligated to provide fixed line voice telephony has been replaced by the twenty-first century reality of Australians using fixed, mobile and text communications over a range of communications equipment and services provided by competitive providers. A new universal service must reflect those changed realities, and with it, the changed environment of a national broadband network, with competitive providers offering service and equipment choice.
The USO ensures access to voice communication services for all Australians. The obligation has changed very little in comparison to the telecommunications market and consumers’ use of services. This presents a number of gaps and risks for consumers, such as data and mobile services. However, updating the obligation to include these services alone will likely fail consumers. This paper argues for a new framework based on a principle of contactability. This new framework will have four key areas: availability, affordability, accessibility and service standards. A further two areas; online service delivery and literacy and empowerment, are also needed to fully ensure contactability is achieved.
This paper presents a position and identifies future research necessary to support the transition from the universal service regime to a universal access regime that enshrines the principle of ensuring that federal, state and local egovernment and other specified digital services are reasonably accessible to all, on an equitable basis, wherever they work or live.

Society news

Teresa Corbin
At the Charles Todd Oration in Sydney on 26 November, the telecommunication industry’s top consumer advocate Teresa Corbin, CEO of ACCAN, was awarded the 2015 Charles Todd Medal on behalf of TelSoc. The Charles Todd Medal is regarded as the highest honour that the Australian telecommunications industry can bestow.

Regional Australia connectivity improves but still lags capital cities: ACMA

Online connectivity and access to the Internet is on the improve for all Australians, including those living in regional and remote areas outside our capital cities and urban areas.

Quarterly telco complaints up, but yearly improvement continues

Telco complaints as a proportion of services in operation (SIO) increased 29% from January to March this year, but dropped by 13.8% compared to the same three month period in 2015.

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Forthcoming events

Prof. Alex Grant
This year HSO will be presented by Professor Alex Grant , CEO of Myriota, founder of Cohda Wireless and previously Professor of Information Theory at the University of SA. The topic: “Satellites, Cars and the Internet of Things: The challenges and rewards of crossing the boundary between academia and industry”. Please join TelSoc and Alex for lunch and drinks at the Telstra Theatrette in Melbourne.
Professor Alex Grant

When: 

Tue, 07 Jun 2016 - 12:00pm EST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
Tim Nulty
Akamai now ranks Australia's Internet service as 60th in the world. "Serious experts agree that the right telecom infrastructure for the next century consists of universal FTTH on the ground and a universal wireless cloud above, supported by the FTTH foundation.  But you don't need a national monopoly to achieve this.  And private monopolies are just as bad. Indeed, a monopoly of any kind is usually counterproductive.  US developments are proving that you can build the future network --even in sparse rural areas--- with multiple parties, even small ones on a purely commercial basis with private money.....And do it faster and better than either private or government monopoly typically does.   Would this work in Australia?"
Dr Tim Nulty
Leslie Nulty

When: 

Tue, 03 May 2016 - 12:00pm EST

Location: 

Ultimo, NSW
Dr Gerd Keiser
Dr Gerd Keiser will present about how Optical fiber technology has significantly bolstered the growth of photonics applications in numerous areas such as the telecom infrastructure, a wide range of sensors, vehicle and airplane control, life sciences research, and biomedical diagnosis, therapy, monitoring, and surgery.
Dr Gerd Keiser, Boston University

When: 

Wed, 11 May 2016 - 12:00pm EST

Location: 

Melbourne, VIC
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Latest presentation media

The Australian Telecoms market has lagged globally which has meant the technological adoptions of new technology has been challenging for global vendors. With industry consolidation and the NBN roll out the changes to the industry are happening more rapidly than ever before. The question is – how will these be adopted – who are the winners and losers?
2016-02-23 - 12:30 EST
Where are the key areas of technology innovation going to occur? What opportunities are there for Australia and Australian companies? Why should we be optimistic about future changes? And what will Telstra’s place be in all this?
2015-11-26 - 12:00 EST
This MEMBERS ONLY event incorporates a sandwich lunch and the TelSoc's Annual General Meeting followed by a lecture about the nbn Satellite program presented by Gavin Williams.
2015-10-27 - 12:00 EST
Alcatel-Lucent’s visiting Strategic Marketing Director, Customer and Market Insight ,Marc Jadoul will deliver a public lecture on IoT and Smart Cities at the University of Melbourne.
2015-10-12 - 17:30 EST
Warren Lemmens will introduce a set of key principles supporting the operational market structure and processes for this future environment, together with the key multi-party relationships and interdependencies to ensure Australian telecommunications services sector can maximise its ability to grow and capitalise on the strategic and economic potential of the digital economy.
2015-09-29 - 12:30 EST
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