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The True Cost of FTTP

Rod Tucker

 

The best way to minimise the value of the NBN is to jerk it around and change direction; the next best way is to build it to a reduced specification. A 93% fibre network is worth a lot more than a network with 60% FTTN, both to a potential purchaser AND to an ongoing owner. The real economic promise of the NBN is the ubiquity of a single, uniform solution.

Oh for a politician with a little vision to see the possibilities!
(... and the gumption to leave the design and build to qualified and visionary engineers)

This article reviews recent developments in global broadband deployments and highlights the growing global dominance of fibre to the premises (FTTP). Australia’s increasing use of fibre to the node (FTTN) has locked the country out of world-class broadband for years to come. If Australia is ever to obtain first-class broadband services, it will be necessary to replace FTTN with higher speed technologies.

For the coalition to accuse Labor of lying on broadband policy is the height of hypocrisy

Paul Budde
Figure 1 – Regional attitudes to mobiles

"Rethinking the Universal Service Obligation" - A report by Prof Reg Coutts commissioned by Vodafone Hutchison Australia. The full report is attached.

Reed Hastings discusses why Netflix is coming to Australia. 

ABS Data Usage Growth (Extract from NBN Co corporate plan)

Rod Sims presentation to NBN Rebooted conference: "The ACCC agrees ... with the Vertigan conclusion that ... disaggregation of NBN Co ...

The end of TUSMA, and the ongoing NBN Co-Telstra negotiations, herald the ideal time for a drastic rework of the Universal Service Obligation – shifting it to NBN Co rather than Telstra, and bringing mobile into the mix. That’s the view of industry veteran professor Reg Coutts, a member of the expert panel that advised on the previous version of the NBN. And with Coutts’ ideas including the possible provision of more mobile backhaul in regional areas, this concept might just mesh with the recent arguments from some parts of the mobile industry.

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